Collaborating for One Health

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Ethipia log sellers

In Ethiopia, UW-Madison faculty, staff and students work with communities to better health through agriculture, water access, new energy systems, livable city initiatives, improving health care and local capacity to provide care and much more.

One Health lies at the core of the Global Health Ethic, recognizing the highly interdependent nature of the health and well-being of humans, domestic animals, wildlife and the ecosystem we all share. It calls on researchers, students and animal and human health practitioners to work together across disciplines and with local communities, creating new synergies to understand the roots of ill health and discover sustainable strategies for the well-being of all.

GHI and its many affiliated investigators and educators across UW-Madison work on many of these issues:

  • Ensuring food security and nutrition,
  • Improving water quality and access to water supplies,
  • Controlling endemic and emerging zoonotic infectious diseases,
  • Discovering energy alternatives
  • Mitigating the negative effects of climate change and understanding and promoting the health potential of reducing the use of fossil fuels.
Haiti_Street Vendor-feature

In rural Haiti, mangoes can have economic benefits and represent better health, a means to improve family well-being and a way to reverse deforestation, says Gergens Polynice. A GHI Seed Grant allowed him to look at how to encourage increased mango production among small farmers.

With the nation’s most academically diverse, yet consolidated, campus and a recognized culture of collaboration, UW-Madison can examine complex global health problems through multiple lenses and mount an unprecedented, cross disciplinary response to worldwide health problems. One Health initiatives connect animal sciences professionals, economists, veterinarians, physicians, nurses, pharmacists, engineers, environmental scientists, policy professionals, anthropologists, sociologists, legal and business scholars, and many others. They link scientific knowledge with cultural wisdom to take practical steps for better health.

Undergraduate and graduate/professional field courses introduce students to One Health through classroom education and hands-on, immersive field experiences around the world.

The Global Health Seminar Series also hosts local, national and international speakers who explore the complexity of advancing health today and tomorrow for humans, animals and the environment.

Read more about the people and programs that are forging new partnerships to improve health for all:

GHI Associate Director Tony Goldberg, a professor of pathobiological sciences in the School of Veterinary Medicine, designed flip-flops that have a special decal on them that encourages Ugandans to wear the sandals to avoid soil-born diseases.

GHI Associate Director Tony Goldberg, a professor of pathobiological sciences in the School of Veterinary Medicine, designed flip-flops that have a special decal on them that encourages Ugandans to wear the sandals to avoid soil-born diseases.

 

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