UW-Madison places high in recent rankings

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The Abraham Lincoln statue remains sentinel to the changing seasons on Bascom Hill at the University of Wisconsin-Madison as the tree foliage continues to change colors during autumn on Nov. 8, 2013. In the background, pedestrians walk past one of the "W" crest banners on Bascom Hill. (Photo by Jeff Miller/UW-Madison)

The new rankings by Shanghai Jio Tong University and Washington Monthly magazine recognize UW-Madison’s standing in such areas as research performance and civic engagement. (Photo by Jeff Miller/UW-Madison)

The University of Wisconsin-Madison has once again placed high in two recent rankings.

The Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU), conducted by Shanghai Jiao Tong University, ranked UW-Madison 24th for the second year in a row. It is the second-highest ranking of any Big Ten school, just behind the University of Michigan, which came in 22nd.

Rankings are based on alumni and staff winning Nobel Prizes and Fields Medals, research performance, highly cited researchers and papers published in Nature and Science, articles indexed in the Thomson Reuters Science Citation Index Expanded and Social Sciences Citation Index, and per capita performance based on the size of an institution.

More than 1,200 universities are ranked by ARWU every year, with the best 500 published.

Washington Monthly magazine ranked UW-Madison 19th in its annual College Guide and Rankings, based on three criteria: civic engagement, research, and social mobility. Washington Monthly gives high marks to institutions that contribute to society, are affordable to attend, and enroll low-income students and help them graduate.

“While rankings are but one measure of a university, we are proud to be included in these two rankings,” says Provost Sarah Mangelsdorf. “The University of Wisconsin-Madison is a world-class university deserving of such praise.”

Kari Knutson/ August 24, 2015

This story originally appeared on the UW-Madison website.

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