Lyric Bartholomay

Education

Ph.D., Comparative Biomedical Sciences and Entomology, UW-Madison

Departments & Organizations

Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine;
Upper Midwestern Center of Excellence in Vector Borne Diseases

Research Focus

invertebrate immunobiology, including innate immune responses to infectious disease agents in mosquitoes, ticks and cultured shrimp

Contact

Email Lyric Bartholomay

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Lyric Bartholomay is an associate professor in the Department of Pathobiological Sciences in the School of Veterinary Medicine. She earned her doctoral degree in comparative biomedical sciences and entomology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She continued on as an instructor and postdoctoral research associate before leaving for an assistant professor position at Iowa State University. Most recently, she served as an associate professor in the Department of Entomology at Iowa State. Her research interests are innate immune responses in the context of mosquito-borne diseases and infectious diseases of cultured shrimp.

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Paul Block

Education

Ph.D., Civil Engineering, University of Colorado;
M.S., University of Colorado;
B.S., Valparaiso University

Departments & Organizations

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering;
International Research Institute for Climate & Society

Research Focus

Water systems and society

Contact

paul.block@wisc.edu

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Paul Block is an assistant professor of civil engineering in the College of Engineering.

Block’s research group creatively addresses critical water resources management challenges in local to international trans-boundary capacities through stakeholder and decision-maker collaborations. They work at the intersection of engineering and socio-economics to enhance management, adaptation, and sustainability of water resources by leveraging across the sciences. The research themes are centered on a systems-based approach, bridging models and methods across climate science, hydrology, management, the environment, economics, and policy, and a systems-based approach to managing water resources for societal benefit.

Methods, models and tools for managing climate variability and change:

  • Hydrologic forecasting and integration into decision models
  • Addressing water quality and quantity extremes
  • Hydro-economics and policy mechanisms
  • Risk, reliability, and uncertainty
  • Sustainable approaches
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Brian Christens

Education

Ph.D., Human & Organizational Development, Vanderbilt University

Departments & Organizations

Department of Civil Society & Community Studies, School of Human Ecology;
Center for Community and Nonprofit Studies;
Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies

Research Focus

civilc engagement, community organizing, empowerment and systems change

Contact

4255 Nancy Nicholas Hall;
608-265-9169


Email Brian Christens

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Brian D. Christens, is the Rothermel-Bascom Associate Professor of Human Ecology in the Department of Civil Society & Community Studies. He is also an affiliate faculty member in the departments of Community & Environmental Sociology, Population Health Sciences, Sociology, Urban and Regional Planning, and the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies. He is faculty director of the Center for Community and Nonprofit Studies – a hub for faculty, staff, students, and community/nonprofit partners collaborating on research and action.

Christens’s research is on civic engagement, community organizing, empowerment, and systems change. He studies processes that enhance people’s and organizations’ ability to take actions to benefit the groups and communities to which they belong. Much of this work takes place alongside community and youth organizing efforts and community-driven health promotion initiatives. An overarching goal is to identify the mechanisms – at multiple levels of analysis – that account for links between engagement in empowerment processes and well-being.  Christens’s background is primarily in psychology (community, developmental, and applied social), but he applies concepts from multiple social science disciplines and use multiple methods to understand and inform community-driven efforts to improve systems.  Consequently, he is also engaged in applied fields such as community development and public health. He serves on the editorial boards of the Adolescent Research Reviewthe American Journal of Community PsychologyCommunity Developmentthe Journal of Community Psychologythe Journal of Youth and Adolescenceand Youth & Society.

Christens earned his Ph.D. in 2008 from Vanderbilt University, where his dissertation work received the 2009 Newbrough Graduate Award for best scholarly work in Human & Organizational Development. In 2012, he received the Michele Alexander Early Career Award for scholarship and service from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues. He is an editorial board member of Youth & Society and the Journal of Youth and Adolescence.

 

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Tony Goldberg

Education

D.V.M.
Ph.D.
MS

Departments & Organizations

Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine

Geographic Focus

Uganda

Research Focus

Ecology, Epidemiology and Evolution of Infectious Disease

Contact

608-890-2618 (Office)


Home Page


Email Tony Goldberg

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Dr. Goldberg’s research and teaching focus on the ecology, epidemiology and evolution of infectious disease, combining field and laboratory studies to understand how pathogens in dynamic ecosystems are transmitted among hosts, across complex landscapes, and over time. This involves numerous projects around the world that use evolutionary and epidemiological tools to track the movement of pathogens, from viruses to bacteria to protozoa and fungi. The overall goal of is to discover generalized mechanisms that govern pathogen transmission, evolution, and emergence, and to improve the health and wellbeing of animals and humans while helping to conserve the rapidly changing ecosystems that we share. Dr. Goldberg received his BA from Amherst College in Biology and English and went on to earn a doctorate degree from Harvard University in Biological Anthropology. He earned his DVM and MS (Epidemiology) from the University of Illinois.

Selected Links

Making a better flip-flop to overcome illiteracy and disease

UW scientist sniffs out possible new tick species

 

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Sundaram Gunasekaran

Education

Ph.D., Agricultural Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana;
M.Eng., AID, Thailand;
B.E., TNAU, India

Departments & Organizations

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering;
Department of Biological Systems Engineering, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

Research Focus

Nanotechnology and biosensing for food, biological, biomedical and environmental applications

Contact

Home Page


Email Sundaram Gunasekaran

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Sundaram Gunasekaran is a professor in Biological Systems Engineering and Food Science. His research focues on nanotechnology and biosensing for food, biological, biomedical, and environmental applications.

His research interests include:

  • Engineering properties and quality of food and biomaterials
  • Rheology of food and other macromolecular systems and hydrogels
  • Sensors and instrumentation
  • Novel and value-added bioprocess engineering
  • Structure function relationship in foods
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Yoshihiro Kawaoka

Education

Ph.D., 1983, Hokkaido University, Japan;
M.S., 1980, Hokkaido University, Japan;
DVM, 1978, The Ministry of Agriculture and Fishery, Japan;
B.S., 1978, Hokkaido University, Japan (Veterinary Medicine)

Departments & Organizations

Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine;
University of Tokyo

Research Focus

Influenza virus, ebola virus

Contact

Email Yoshihiro Kawaoka

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Yoshi Kawaoka, Ph.D., is a globally recognized influenza expert and professor in the UW–Madison School of Veterinary Medicine. He was recognized with the 2017 Popular Mechanics Breakthrough Award for his efforts to understand and prevent pandemics.

He is an expert avian influenza virus and showed that a 1918-like pandemic influenze virus (Spanish flu) could be recreated again in nature. He also led a group that created a whole-virus vaccine against Ebola that was safe and effective in primates and traveled to Sierra Leone to learn more about the disease.

His work is also changing how flu vaccines are made by providing faster and more cost-effective methods. Kawaoka’s team established a new strategy to generate and manipulate the virus – a system called “reverse genetics” – that has revolutionized the field. In 2007 he co-founded FluGen, a Madison-based company dedicated to preventing and treating both seasonal and pandemic outbreaks that kill hundreds of thousands worldwide.

Kawaoka’s research looks at the Influenza virus: the e molecular mechanism of interspecies transmission of the virus leading to influenza pandemics in humans; and the molecular pathogenesis of influenza in poultry and mammals. With the Ebola virus, he studies the role of viral proteins in pathogenesis and viral replication.

Kawaoka also teaches Veterinary Virology, providing background information in basic virology, as well as a clinically-oriented review of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of the major viral diseases of animals.

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Heinz Klug

Departments & Organizations

Wisconsin Law School

Contact

Email Heinz Klug

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Heinz Klug is Professor of Law at the University of Wisconsin Law School and an Honorary Senior Research Associate in the School of Law at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Growing up in Durban, South Africa, he participated in the anti-apartheid struggle, spent 11 years in exile and returned to South Africa in 1990 as a member of the ANC Land Commission and researcher for Zola Skweyiya, chairperson of the ANC Constitutional Committee. He was also a team member on the World Bank mission to South Africa on Land Reform and Rural Restructuring. He has taught at Wisconsin since September 1996.

Professor Klug taught law at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg from 1991-1996, offering courses on Public International Law, Human Rights Law, Property Law, Post-Apartheid Law and Introduction to South African Law, among others. He also worked as a legal advisor after 1994 with the South African Ministry of Water Affairs and Forestry as well as the Ministry of Land Affairs on water law and land tenure issues.

Professor Klug has presented lectures and papers on the South African constitution, land reform, and water law, among other topics, in Australia, Canada, Colombia, Ethiopia, Germany, South Africa, the Netherlands, and at several U.S. law schools. His research interests include: constitutional transitions, constitution-building, human rights, international legal regimes and natural resources. His current teaching areas include Comparative Constitutional Law, Constitutional Law, Human Rights and Humanitarian Law, Property, and Natural Resources Law.

Professor Klug’s book on South Africa’s democratic transition, “Constituting Democracy” was published by Cambridge University Press in 2000.

 

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Neil Kodesh

Education

Ph.D., Northwestern University;
MA, Northwestern University;
BA, Pomona College

Departments & Organizations

Department of History, College of Letters and Science

Research Focus

Health and healing, historical anthropology, methodologies for writing early African history

Contact

Email Neil Kodesh

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Neil Kodesh is faculty director of the African Studies Program. He is a historian of precolonial East Africa with a particular emphasis on the Great Lakes region. His research and teaching interests center on health and healing, historical anthropology, and methodologies for writing early African history.

His first book, “Beyond the Royal Gaze: Clanship and Public Healing in Buganda,” won the Melville Herskovits Prize of the African Studies Association. His current project examines the history of medical pluralism in the Great Lakes region from ca. 1000-1940. Kodesh also serves as an editor of the UW Press book series, Africa and the Diaspora: History.

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Christopher Olsen

Education

D.V.M.
Ph.D.

Departments & Organizations

University Administration
Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine

Research Focus

Zoonotic Infectious Diseases

Contact

(608) 265-9535
olsenc@vetmed.wisc.edu


Email Christopher Olsen

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Christopher W. Olsen is associate director for One Health and director of the Graduate|Professional|Capstone Certificate in Global Health program at the Global Health Institute (GHI). He is a professor emeritus of public health ih in the Department of Pathobiological Sciences at the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and affiliated with the Master of Public Health degree program, including membership on the MPH steering and admissions committees. He has previously served as a member of the UW-Madison Morgridge Center for Public Service and Wisconsin Without Borders Advisory Committees and as an alternate representative to the National Academy of Sciences Institute of Medicine Global Forum on Innovations in Health Professional Education.

Olsen received his D.V.M. and Ph.D. degrees from Cornell University and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the UW-Madison. He has held several administrative positions in addition to his faculty roles.

From 2007-2012 he served as associate dean for academic affairs in the School of Veterinary Medicine, and from September 2012 through June 2014, he was interim vice provost for teaching and learning for the UW-Madison. In that senior university leadership position, he co-chaired the university’s Educational Innovation effort and the University of Wisconsin System learning analytics project, and was a member of the core team planning for UW-Madison’s Higher Learning Commission reaccreditation, among other responsibilities. From 2014 to 2015, he was acting director of GHI. His research and teaching work has taken him to many countries throughout the world, including most recently working in Ghana on a project to develop One Health and girls’ empowerment curricula for junior high school students.

Olsen’s research focused on public health aspects of influenza in animals and the genetic factors that control transmission of influenza viruses among people and animals. In addition, he has very strong educational interests in zoonotic infectious diseases more generally, in building bridges between the veterinary medical and human medical professions, and in promoting an interdisciplinary One Health approach for global and public health.

Olsen completed the Joseph F. Kauffman Administrative Development Program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2009-2010 and was a Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC) Academic Leadership Program Fellow in 2010-2011. He has published more than 65 refereed research and educational journal articles, as well as numerous proceedings and book chapters. He is also the recipient of several faculty honors, including election to the UW-Madison Teaching Academy and the School of Veterinary Medicine’s Norden Distinguished Teacher Award and Walter F. Renk Distinguished Professor Award.

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Susan Paskewitz

Education

Ph.D. University of Georgia
M.S. Southern Illinois University
B.A. Southern Illinois University

Departments & Organizations

Department of Entomology, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
Upper Midwestern Center of Excellence for Vector-Borne Disease

Contact

Email Susan Paskewitz

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Susan Paskewitz is chair of the Department of Entomology and director of the Upper Midwestern Center of Excellence for Vector-Borne Disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention awarded $10 million to a consortium of Midwestern university to establish the research and training program to stem the spread of disease carried by vectors like ticks and mosquitoes.

Paskewitz’s research program centers on medically important arthropods, including ticks and mosquitoes, and the human pathogens they transmit.  She teaches classes in global health and medical entomology and her research laboratory group works on problems of local and global health impacts.  Her current projects include and ecological/epidemiological work that targets disease reduction.  She is especially interested in: ecology and epidemiology of arthropod-borne disease in Wisconsin, outreach on mosquito and tick-borne disease and prevention.

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Keith Poulsen

Education

Ph.D., Comparative Biomedical Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison
DVM, University of Wisconsin-Madison
B.S., Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Departments & Organizations

Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory;
Department of Medical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine

Research Focus

Cattle health and zoonotic infectious diseases

Contact

Email Keith Poulsen

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Keith Poulsen is the diagnostic case and outreach coordinator at the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. He also holds a second appointment as a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Medical Sciences Department at the School of Veterinary Medicine and practices as a specialist in Large Animal Internal Medicine in the UW Veterinary Care Large Animal Teaching Hospital.

Poulsen is a Wisconsin native and earned a B.S. in Biochemistry (2000) and DVM (2004) at the University of Wisconsin.  He interned at North Carolina State University in the Food Animal Medicine and Surgery Program prior to returning to Wisconsin for his residency in Large Animal Internal Medicine and earned diplomate status from ACVIM in 2008.

Following clinical training, Poulsen earned a Ph.D. in Comparative Biomedical Sciences from the University of Wisconsin in 2012.  He spent two years at Oregon State University as a faculty member in Large Animal Internal Medicine and returned to the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory and the School of Veterinary Medicine in 2014.

Poulsen has special interests in cattle health and zoonotic infectious diseases.  He also has an active role at GHI with a current focus on cattle health in Ecuador.

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Anne Pringle

Education

Ph.D., Botany and Genetics, Duke University;
A.B., University of Chicago

Departments & Organizations

Department of Botany, College of Letters and Science;
Department of Bacteriology, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

Research Focus

Ecology and evolution and the fungi

Contact

Email Anne Pringle

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Cooperation not toxicity attracts Anne Pringle, an associate professor of botany and bacteriology, to the study of Amanita phalloides, or the death cap mushroom. Fungi as a group are poorly known, says Pringle, who was an associate professor of organismic and evolutionary biology at Harvard University before coming to Wisconsin. “The fungi are basically a jungle of species. There are an estimated one to 10 million species, and we have names for 100,000, which suggests how little we know. You can go outside and pick up some soil, put it in a gene sequencer, and you will see a heck of a lot of species that do not match anything seen before.”

The Pringle laboratory focuses on the biology of species whose life histories and body plans seem very different from our own. Fungi encompass a hetereogeneous array of both microbes and macrobes, and the Pringle laboratory uses fungi as tools to test and elucidate general principles of ecology and evolution.

Read more:

Botany’s Pringle examines mysterious fungi 

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Kurt Sladky

Education

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine
M.S., Psychology (Animal Behavior), University of Wisconsin-Madison
B.S., Meat and Animal Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Departments & Organizations

Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine

Contact

Email Kurt Sladky

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Research

I have 2 current research areas of interest:

  • My clinical research encompasses comparative nondomestic animal analgesia/anesthesia, with an emphasis on analgesic efficacy in reptiles, amphibians, fish and avian species, and anesthetic efficacy in nonhuman primates.
  • From a theoretical perspective, I am interested in the evolution of nociception, from invertebrates to mammals.
  • My broader research interests include conservation medicine and the interface between wildlife, domestic animal, and human health and disease. Within this context, my focus is anthropogenic influences on infectious and noninfectious diseases affecting free-ranging wildlife species, and the consequences on ecosystem, animal, and human health.

Responsibilities

  • Clinical responsibilities include: medical and surgical management of pet nondomestic, zoo, and wildlife species
  • Teaching responsibilities include: 1) fourth year veterinary students clinical rotation in Special Species Health and nondomestic animals anesthesia didactic; 2) third year students Special Species Medicine; 3) coordinator for upper level undergraduate course, Diseases of Wildlife; 4) I also teach a variety of single lectures: Zootoxicology, parasitology of nondomestic pets, avian radiology, and ethics of maintaining elephants in captivity.
  • Advisor, University of Wisconsin Global Health Initiative, Advisor
  • Wildlife Data Integration Network (WDIN) Team: Megan Hines (Technical Manager), Cris March (Content Manager), Victoria Szewczyk (Administrative Manager), Kurt Sladky (Project Manager)
  • Member, Master’s of Public Health Advisory Committee, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health.

Clinical Interests

My clinical focus is Zoological Medicine, which encompasses 3 broad animal areas: zoo and aquaria, free-ranging wildlife, and nondomestic pets. I am Section Head of the Special Species Health Service, and I oversee Resident and student training in Zoological Medicine.

 

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Sherry Tanumihardjo

Education

Ph.D.
M.S.

Departments & Organizations

Department of Nutritional Sciences, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

Contact

Email Sherry Tanumihardjo

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Dr. Sherry Tanumihardjo manages a progressive research and outreach team at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the Department of Nutritional Sciences. She has almost three decades of experience with vitamin A and carotenoids. Her multidisciplinary research approach is enhanced by her broad educational background in chemistry (B.S.), biochemistry (M.S.) and nutrition (Ph.D.). She has two main research foci. These include vitamin A assessment methodology and carotenoid bioavailability. These two overlap when investigating provitamin A carotenoids. Tanumihardjo has authored more than 100 research publications, chapters and technical documents and has been an invited speaker nationally and internationally. Her research group works with animal models to answer various questions on issues related to vitamin A toxicity and deficiency. The team takes these research outcomes and applies them to humans. The team has conducted studies in the United States, Indonesia, South Africa, Ghana, Burkina Faso, and Zambia. She has acted as a consultant to many studies throughout the world to assist with study design and appropriate standardization. She is a strong advocate for the promotion of nutritionally enhanced staple foods, vegetables and fruits to enhance overall health and general well-being. Sherry is the Director of the undergraduate Certificate in Global Health and co-teaches Introduction to Global Health, the one global health class that all declaring students must take.

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Michel Wattiaux

Education

Ph.D., Dairy Science, UW-Madison;
B.S., M.S., Universite Catholique de Louvain, Belgium

Departments & Organizations

Department of Dairy Science, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences;
Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies

Research Focus

Environmental impact of dairy production, especially gaseous emissions

Contact

Email Michel Wattiaux

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Michel Waittiaux is a professor of dairy systems management with the Dairy Science Department. His teaching and research focuses on the improvement of dairy farm management in a way that fosters the social, economical and environmental soundness of production systems.

His classes include Agriculture in Emerging Economies: Dairying in Mexico, which includes an end-of-summer, two-week field program in Mexico, and Effective Teaching in International — Science and Engineering— Classrooms, a course that challenge doctoral candidates to think of ways to take advantage of cultural and national diversity as an asset rather than an impediment to creating a rich learning environment for all students in the classroom.

Wattiaux’s research program focuses on the environmental impact of dairy production with an emphasis on undesirable gaseous emissions to the atmosphere known to have negative impacts on human heath and balance of natural ecosystems (ammonia) or to contribute to climate change (methane). He seeks to find “win-win” situations, making farms more economically profitable (reducing feed costs) and simultaneously more environmentally friendly (reduction in undesirable emissions).

He and his research collaborators have studied the effects of dietary composition on manure ammonia emission and enteric methane emission from dairy cattle. Wattiaux has received USDA International Science and Education (ISE) grants to foster collaboration with Mexican and Canadian partners to develop research tools to evaluate Dairy Agro-ecosystems Sustainability.

Originally from a dairy farm in Belgium, Wattiaux was raised with a strong commitment to making the family farm profitable. After earning a Bachelor’s Degree in Agricultural Sciences in Belgium, he came to the United States on an International Four-H Youth Exchange and lived on farms throughout the country.

He earned his doctoral degree in Dairy Science at the UW-madison and worked with the Babcock Institute for international Dairy Research and Development, where he authored and co-authored four dairy management-related books in a series of Technical Dairy Guides. These books are now available in seven languages and have been distributed in more than 80 countries around the world. He co-directed the Institute from 1996 until May 2000.

Read more:

Dissolving Borders: Course puts distances aside to explore the dairy industries in Wisconsin and Mexico

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