CUGH Webinar: “The Global Surgery Deficit”

When

Monday July 20th, 2015, 12:30pm

Presenter(s)

Girma Tefera, Professor of Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health; Fizan Abdullah, Associate Professor of Pediatric Surgery and International Health at Johns Hopkins University

Where

Webinar

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Approximately 5 billion out of 7 billion people in the world have no or little access to basic surgical care. Out of the roughly 250 million operations performed each year, only 3.5% are performed on the poorest 1/3 of the world’s population. Injuries alone cause 5.7 million deaths yearly, much more than the 3.8 million deaths caused by malaria, HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis combined. Many of these fatal injuries could have been treated by basic surgery, if it were available. Although international priorities are starting to reflect the importance of non-communicable diseases and injury, investment in essential surgical services lags far behind other healthcare priorities.

This webinar, hosted by our friends at the Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH), will describe the magnitude of the global surgical deficit and what needs to be done to address it, and share opportunities for participants to help tackle this challenge.

This webinar will describe the magnitude of the global surgical deficit and what needs to be done to address it, and share opportunities for participants to help tackle this challenge.

Speakers will include Girma Tefera, Professor of Surgery at University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health; and Fizan Abdullah, Associate Professor of Pediatric Surgery and International Health at Johns Hopkins University. Moderating the panel will be CUGH Executive Director Keith Martin.

You must regf5fb206be432d8346f2cbada7074180bister for the webinar, registration link here.

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