In the heart of devastating outbreak, research team unlocks secrets of Ebola

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someone


a vial is labeled and prepared to hold blood from an Ebola patient in Sierra Leone. Researchers from the UW-Madison, the University of Tokyo and the University of Sierra Leone will compare blood from those who died of the virus to those who survived and those who never got sick to try and develop treatment. (Photo courtesy of Kawaoka Lab.)

This story appeared first at news.wisc.edu.

In a comprehensive and complex molecular study of blood samples from Ebola patients in Sierra Leone, published today (Nov. 16, 2017) in Cell Host & Microbe, a scientific team led by the University of Wisconsin–Madison has identified signatures of Ebola virus disease that may aid in future treatment efforts.

Conducting a sweeping analysis of everything from enzymes to lipids to immune-system-associated molecules, the team — which includes researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, the University of Tokyo and the University of Sierra Leone — found 11 biomarkers that distinguish fatal infections from nonfatal ones and two that, when screened for early symptom onset, accurately predict which patients are likely to die.

With these results, says senior author Yoshihiro Kawaoka, a virology professor at the UW–Madison School of Veterinary Medicine, clinicians can prioritize the scarce treatment resources available and provide care to the sickest patients. Kawaoka is also a member of the GHI Advisory Committee and received a 2017 GHI Seed Grant to catalog viruses circulating among West Africans with an eye to improving diagnoses, identifying new viruses and, potentially, preventing the next epidemic.

Studying Ebola in animal models is difficult; in humans, next to impossible. Yet, in Sierra Leone in 2014, a natural and devastating experiment played out. In September of that year, an Ebola outbreak like no other was beginning to surge in the West African nation. By December, as many as 400 Ebola cases would be reported there each week.

That fall, Kawaoka sought access to patient samples. He has spent a career trying to understand infectious diseases like Ebola — how do they make people sick, how do bodies respond to infection, how can public health officials stay at least a step ahead?

“Here, there is a major outbreak of Ebola. It is very rare for us to encounter that situation,” says Kawaoka, who is also a professor of virology at the University of Tokyo.

Yet blood samples were proving difficult to obtain and people continued to die.

Then, just weeks before Christmas, Kawaoka learned about a colleague in his very own department at UW–Madison, a research fellow from Sierra Leone named Alhaji N’jai, who was producing radio stories for people back home to help them protect themselves from Ebola. The pair forged a fortuitous partnership.

“He knows many people high up in the Sierra Leone government,” says Kawaoka. “He is very smart and very good at explaining things in lay terms.”

By Christmas, Kawaoka, N’jai and Peter Halfmann, a senior member of Kawaoka’s team, were in Sierra Leone.

“On the first trip, Alhaji took me to Parliament and we talked to a special advisor to the president, then the vice chancellor of the University of Sierra Leone,” says Kawaoka. “We got the support of the university, which helped us identify military hospitals and provided space. We went to the Ministry of Health and Sanitation and the chief medical officer and we explained what we hoped to do.”

Yoshihiro Kawaoka, professor of pathobiological sciences at the UW-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine, meets with Ekundayo Thompson, vice chancellor of the University of Sierra Leone, while in the African nation to establish a partnership to study and fight Ebola while improving the research capacity and infrastructure of the University of Sierra Leone. (Photo courtesy of the Kawaoka Lab.)

By February of 2015, Kawaoka and other select senior researchers on his team, including Amie Eisfeld, set up a lab in a military hospital responding to the outbreak in the capital city of Freetown (the researchers never entered patient wards). With the approval of patients and the government of Sierra Leone, health workers collected blood samples from patients after they were diagnosed with Ebola and at multiple points thereafter.

They obtained 29 blood samples from 11 patients who ultimately survived and nine blood samples from nine patients who died from the virus. The samples were transported to the lab where Kawaoka’s experienced and expertly trained team inactivated the virus according to approved protocols. Blood samples were subsequently shipped to UW–Madison and partner institutions for analysis.

For comparison, the research team also obtained blood samples from 10 healthy volunteers with no exposure to Ebola virus.

SIDEBAR: Video reaches ‘Spiderman’ audience with Ebola messaging

“Our team studied thousands of molecular clues in each of these samples, sifting through extensive data on the activity of genes, proteins and other molecules to identify those of most interest,” says Katrina Waters, a biologist at PNNL and a corresponding author of the study. “This may be the most thorough analysis yet of blood samples of patients infected with the Ebola virus.”

The team found that survivors had higher levels of some immune-related molecules, and lower levels of others compared to those who died. Plasma cytokines, which are involved in immunity and stress response, were higher in the blood of people who perished. Fatal cases had unique metabolic responses compared to survivors, higher levels of virus, changes to plasma lipids involved in processes like blood coagulation, and more pronounced activation of some types of immune cells.

UW-Madison’s Yoshihiro Kawaoka, Peter Halfmann and Alhaji Njai stand outside of a military hospital with Foday Sahr, a Sierra Leone military official and chair of microbiology at the University of Sierra Leone. Ebola patients are treated at many of the country’s military hospitals like the Joint Medical Unit.
(Photo courtesy of the Kawaoka Lab.)

Pancreatic enzymes also leaked into the blood of patients who died, suggesting that damage from these enzymes contributes to the tissue damage characteristic of fatal Ebola virus disease.

And, critically, the study showed that levels of two biomarkers, known as L-threonine (an amino acid) and vitamin D binding protein, may accurately predict which patients live and which die. Both were present at lower levels at the time of admission in the patients who ultimately perished.

“We want to understand why those two compounds are discriminating factors,” says Kawaoka. “We might be able to develop drugs.”

When Ebola virus leads to death, experts believe it is because of overwhelming viral replication. Symptoms of infection include severe hemorrhaging, vomiting and diarrhea, fever and more.

Kawaoka and his collaborators hope to better understand why there are differences in how patients’ bodies respond to infection, and why some people die while others live. The current study is part of a larger, multicenter effort funded by the National Institutes of Health.

“This may be the most thorough analysis yet of blood samples of patients infected with the Ebola virus.”

Katrina Waters

“The whole purpose is to study the responses of human and animal bodies to infection from influenza, Ebola, SARS and MERS, and to understand how they occur,” Kawaoka explains. “Among the various pathways, is there anything in common?”

In the current Ebola study, the team found that many of the molecular signals present in the blood of sick, infected patients overlap with sepsis, a condition in which the body — in response to infection by bacteria or other pathogens — mounts a damaging inflammatory reaction.

And the results contribute a wealth of information for other scientists aimed at studying Ebola, the study authors say.

Kawaoka says he is grateful to UW–Madison, University Health Services and Public Health Madison and Dane County for assistance, particularly with respect to his research team’s travel between Madison and Sierra Leone. Each provided protocols, monitoring, approval and other needed support during the course of the study.

“I hope another outbreak like this never occurs,” says Kawaoka. “But hopefully this rare opportunity to study Ebola virus in humans leads to fewer lives lost in the future.”

By Kelly April Tyrell, UW communications/ November 16, 2017

THE STUDY WAS FUNDED BY A JAPANESE HEALTH AND LABOR SCIENCES RESEARCH GRANT; BY GRANTS FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH ON INNOVATIVE AREAS FROM THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, CULTURE, SPORTS, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY OF JAPAN; BY EMERGING/RE-EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES PROJECT OF JAPAN; AND BY AN ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPLEMENT TO GRANT U19AI106772, PROVIDED BY THE U.S. NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES, PART OF THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. SUPPORT WAS ALSO PROVIDED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING AT THE ICAHN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AT MOUNT SINAI AND BY A GRANT FROM THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES (P41 BM013493). SOME ANALYSES WERE PERFORMED AT THE ENVIRONMENTAL MOLECULAR SCIENCES LABORATORY, A NATIONAL SCIENTIFIC USER FACILITY SPONSORED BY THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH.

 

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someone

2018 Global Health Symposium

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someone

The Global Health Institute at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is pleased to welcome Professor Susan Paskewitz as the keynote speaker for the 14th annual Global Health Symposium: Advancing Health in Uncertain Times. The symposium begins at 4:30 p.m., Tuesday, April 10, 2018.

Paskewitz is professor and chair of the Department of Entomology in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. She also is co-director of the Upper Midwestern Center of Excellence for Vector-Borne Disease funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and a member of the GHI Advisory Committee. Her research focuses on medically important arthropods, including ticks and mosquitoes, and the human pathogens they transmit. She also teaches classes in global health and medical entomology.

The annual symposium provides a forum for the UW-Madison global health community to showcase recent work and connect with each other. The evening includes oral and poster presentations and a closing panel on a global health hot topic.

Watch this page for more details and registration information.

Call for abstracts

Deadline: February 12, 2018

The call is open to members and partners of the UW-Madison community who are addressing global health and disease. From basic research to education to applied projects in the field, the symposium hopes to showcase the full spectrum of UW-Madison global health activity. We encourage and welcome presentations from all disciplines—from arts, agriculture, and business, to education, engineering, and humanities, to all of the health sciences and more. 

Following the keynote address, selected oral presenters will deliver their work in 15-minute (including time for questions), concurrent sessions. Posters will be available for viewing all evening, and a poster session follows the presentations. Hors d’oeuvres will be served during the networking reception that closes the evening.

Abstract Submission Form

 

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someone

Apply now for 2018 global health grants

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someone

The University of Wisconsin-Madison Global Health Institute (GHI) is pleased to announce the application period is open for its 2018 grants and awards. This competitive grant program is designed to support global health efforts of faculty, staff and graduate students across campus, fostering the Wisconsin Idea locally and globally.

This year, the Institute will offer a new grant, the Henry Anderson III Graduate Student Award in Environmental, Occupational and Public Health, in addition to Graduate Student Research Awards, Visiting Scholar Awards and Faculty and Staff Travel Awards. There will be no Seed Grant awards in 2018.

An expert on environmental and occupational disease, public health, epidemiology, disease and exposure surveillance, Henry Anderson III, M.D., is an adjunct professor in the Department of Population Health and former chief medical officer for the Wisconsin Division of Public Health. With the graduate student award, he hopes to support students pursuing research in the area of environment, occupation and global health.

The deadline for GHI grant applications is 11:59 p.m. January 29, 2018.

  • Henry Anderson III Graduate Student Award in Environmental, Occupational and Public Health supports graduate students interested in pursuing research in those topic areas. Application information is available here.
  • Graduate Student Research Awards supports doctoral students pursuing work in any relevant discipline whose graduate work will enhance global health activities on the UW-Madison campus and beyond. Grants of up to $5,000 each will be awarded. Application information is available here.
  • Visiting Scholar Awards brings visitors to UW-Madison who substantially enhance global health activities on campus in collaboration with a sponsoring UW-Madison faculty member or faculty team. Grants of up to $8,000 each will be awarded. Application information is available here.
  • Faculty and Staff Travel Awards are available for UW-Madison faculty and staff who are GHI affiliates. They can be used for international travel related to educational and research activities. Grants of up to $2,500 each will be awarded. Application information is available here.

To learn more about previous grant recipients, visit the global health research pages. For more information about the grants and grant process, contact the Global Health Institute, 265-9299.

By Ann Grauvogl/ November 9, 2017

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someone

The President of Botswana Visits the Washington Mandela Fellows on Campus and Sparks Conservation Discussion

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someone

This story was originally posted by UW-Madison International Division 

For six weeks, UW–Madison has been home to 25 young Africans taking part in the Mandela Washington Fellowship—an academic and experiential learning program designed to prepare them to be future leaders in their countries. July 25, the final day of the program, was made especially significant through a visit to campus by Lieutenant General Seretse Khama Ian Khama, president of Botswana.

Since assuming the presidency in 2008, Khama has worked to build Botswana into one of the continent’s most stable nations. Understanding the larger role Botswana’s national resources will play in the future, Khama has continually championed sustainable growth and responsible conservation.

President Ian Khama

President Ian Khama at Botswana spoke at a faculty round table discussion at issues surrounding conservation.

Khama met with the Mandela Washington fellows during a luncheon to conclude their program. He spoke on the importance of conservation to the future of Africa and gave the young leaders the opportunity to ask him about the challenges faced by his nation as well as their own countries.

President Ian Khama and Mandela Washington Fellows

Members of the Mandela-Washington Fellows are pictured with Ian Khama, president of the Republic of Botswana during a luncheon ceremony hosted by the International Division, where Khama was presented with a Global Citizen Award. The event was hosted in the Alumni Lounge of the Pyle Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on July 28, 2017. (Photo by Bryce Richter / UW-Madison)

“When we talk about conservation, there are three entities responsible for driving it if you are to have any success,” Khama said. “Those areas are the conservation NGOs, the private sector, and government. I have learned in government that if you have committed leadership, you can achieve more than the other two sectors combined. That is something we have been trying to set an example for by doing what we are doing in Botswana when it comes to sustainability and conservation and protecting the flora and fauna.”

Protecting resources

The protection of fauna is an ongoing battle given the prominence of poachers on the African continent. However, policies established in Botswana have greatly reduced the number of animals killed each year from poaching.

Khama stated around 160,000 of the estimated 415,000 elephants living in Africa can be found in Botswana. Thanks to strict measures against poaching, including a ban on all hunting other than on private ranches, Botswana only lost 44 elephants in 2016 to poaching. Yet on the continent, almost 100 elephants can be lost every day.

“We are not very kind to poachers, and they know it,” Khama said. “We use all of our security services. We use police, army, intelligence and correctional services.”

Khama has also led Botswana in responsible development across the nation and with neighboring countries. Mandela Washington Fellow Diénéba Deme-Diallo, a radio journalist from Mali, asked Khama about key policies Botswana has implemented to support environmental issues. Khama cited several examples, including the requirement that before any infrastructure projects begin, an environmental impact assessment must be completed. A team of dedicated experts then assess how the project might negatively impact the environment, archaeological sites, water resources, vegetation and the well-being of people.

“As we develop our countries we should do it with the natural resources in mind and ensure it is done in a sustainable way,” Khama said.

Khama also discussed efforts to roll out a sustainability agenda to the rest of the African continent at a 2012 summit in partnership with Washington, D.C. based Conservation International. The summit was attended by heads of state from 10 countries and focused on the importance of the environment and discussed the introduction of natural capital accounting into national programs and policies. According to Khama, such collaboration is crucial to ensuring a sustainable future for Africa.

Global Citizen Award

During his visit, Khama’s conservation efforts were recognized with the International Division’s Global Citizen Award. In giving the award, Guido Podestá, vice provost and dean of UW–Madison’s International Division, recognized many of Khama’s roles in promoting conservation, noting Khama’s service as a board member for Conservation International and his pivotal role in establishing the Khama Rhino Sanctuary and Kalahari Conservation Society.

Guido Podesta and Ian Khama

Guido Podesta (left), dean of International Division, presents a Global Citizen Award to Ian Khama (right), president of the Republic of Botswana during a lunch ceremony attended by members of the UW community, including the Mandela-Washington Fellows, held in the Alumni Lounge of the Pyle Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on July 28, 2017. (Photo by Bryce Richter / UW-Madison)

“President Khama’s work continues to inspire in a world where we see more and more how critical it is to preserve the natural resources all around us,” Podestá said. “The policies and actions he has taken to introduce sustainable practices to Botswana and neighboring nations will have a significant impact on the future of Africa.”

While accepting the honor, Khama reaffirmed his commitment to safeguarding the natural treasures of Botswana and working to create a culture of sustainability throughout Africa.

“I feel very honored to be presented with this distinguished award,” Khama said. “This recognition is certainly a source of encouragement and motivation.”

The Wisconsin-Botswana connection

While more than 8,400 miles separate UW–Madison from Botswana, many individuals associated with Wisconsin and the university have created significant ties with the African nation.

During a roundtable discussion between Khama, faculty and university partners, UW–Madison alumnus and International Advisory board member John Lange, who previously served as U.S. ambassador to Botswana, recalled a notable Wisconsin connection.

Ian Khama and University of Wisconsin-Madison faculty

Ian Khama, president of the Republic of Botswana, answers questions from members of a round-table discussion session hosted by the International Division at the Pyle Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on July 28, 2017. Earlier in the day, President Khama was presented with a Global Citizen Award. (Photo by Bryce Richter / UW-Madison)

“I still remember the visit of the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Tommy Thompson, the former governor of Wisconsin, to Gaborone in 2002,” Lange said. “That visit proved to be a pivotal moment that helped spur the creation of President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR).”

Khama’s visit holds additional significance in that he is not the first head of state from Botswana to visit the university. International Division Advisory Board Member and alumnus Tony Carroll, a key figure in arranging Khama’s visit in partnership with members of the Botswana government, also arranged a visit to campus from Botswana President Quett Masire in 1996.

“The fact that two presidents of a nation would choose to visit the university in a relatively short period signifies an unusually deep relationship—one that could blossom to mutual benefit from Wisconsin and Botswana,” said Carroll. “The relationship between the university and Botswana is a robust articulation of the Wisconsin idea.”

Ambassador John Lange, Ambassador David Newman, President Ian Khama, Dean Guido Podestá, and Tony Carroll.

From left to right:
Ambassador John Lange, Ambassador David Newman, President Ian Khama,
Dean Guido Podestá,
and Tony Carroll.
(Photo by Bryce Richter / UW-Madison)

UW–Madison’s student activities and programs often engage Botswana as well.

The African Studies Program also sees students, faculty and alumni involved with Botswana and the rest of Africa. Wisconsin has awarded 750 Ph.D. degrees to Africa specialists since 1961. Two students served as interns in Botswana last year, with one continuing to work with David Newman, ambassador of the Republic of Botswana to the U.S.

Several alumni from Botswana have also assumed leadership roles. Two of the vice chancellors of the University of Botswana have received degrees from the University of Wisconsin–Madison, and several top leaders in government attended the university.

Given so many ties between the university and Botswana, leaders at UW–Madison are optimistic that the university and Botswana could collaborate in more ways in the future.

“I am proud that UW–Madison is serving as a stage for talks on important topics such as conservation, leadership, and the future of Africa,” said Podestá. “It also strikes me that this occasion could mark a new point in the relationship between the university and Botswana. I look forward to exploring ways the university and Botswana can connect so that we can continue to learn through each of our nations.”

– By Steven Barcus

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someone

UW Hmong: American Nurse Brings her Community to the Doctor’s Office

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someone

Originally posted in WiscNews

MADISON – Nursing student Maichou Lor wanted to bring her fellow Hmong community members out of the shadows and into the doctor’s office.
Lor, who recently received her Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Nursing, was born in a refugee camp in Thailand before her family immigrated to Madison. As she pursued nursing, starting in high school, Lor discovered that the Hmong immigrant community lacked access to major medical care because low rates of literacy and English proficiency kept their health status murky. In an interdisciplinary research program, Lor developed new survey tools that respond to the needs of the Hmong, which she hopes can help close gaps in access to care among her own community and other underserved populations.

Along the way, she became the first Hmong-American nurse to earn a Ph.D. in the United States.

“Throughout my whole life, I saw a lot of inequalities and injustice in issues surrounding health care,” says Lor, “not just among the Hmong population. It’s the Cambodian population, the Laotian population, a lot of Southeast Asian populations who have gone through the same kind of history that we have are also struggling.”

Following the Vietnam War, Wisconsin became a hub for displaced Hmong from Southeast Asia immigrating to the United States. The Hmong community is the largest Asian population in Wisconsin, which has the third-largest Hmong population, behind California and Minnesota. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, more than 54,000 Hmong lived in Wisconsin in 2015, nearly 20 percent of all Hmong in the country.

As an undergraduate nursing student at the UW, Lor partnered with three other Hmong students to try to survey the local Hmong population about cancer screening. But the group found that written surveys, even if they only asked for true-false answers, resulted in mostly blank responses.

“We ended up just reading the questions and having people raise their hands to respond, but we realized there’s contamination, because they just looked around at how others were responding,” says Lor. “That was an ‘aha’ moment for me, to realize we can’t collect data from this population, and I’m sure there are other populations experiencing the same thing.”

Lor saw that without an effective way to ask Hmong about their health, there was no way to fully integrate them into the health care system. In graduate school, she worked with an interdisciplinary group of mentors to create a data collection tool that responded to the needs of the Hmong community.

She adapted a survey system from sociology that combines prerecorded oral translations in the Hmong language, written text in English and color-coded responses to facilitate communication and to accommodate any level of language proficiency. In addition, a family helper was included to assist with the survey completion process. The tool allowed Lor to successfully survey all of her study participants on their health status, without missing responses.

One concern was that respondents might be reluctant to answer a question that may be sensitive or potentially embarrassing in the presence of family members. To test this, Lor included a question about frequent urination.

“What I realized is because I translated the question in a culturally sensitive way, people were fine answering it, and they didn’t see any question as being too sensitive or embarrassing to answer,” says Lor.

“She’s just tenacious. She’s the most curious student I’ve ever had,” says Barbara Bowers, the associate dean for research at the School of Nursing and Lor’s advisor. “She ends up being a cultural broker for a lot of people in the Hmong community.”

“I’m hoping she comes back here and establishes her own center for Hmong health at the university,” says Bowers.

Lor is leaving Madison in August to train in informatics and data visualization at Columbia University. She wants to find ways to communicate with her patients about their health that bypass linguistic and cultural barriers. But Wisconsin remains her home.

“My family threw me a graduation party back in May, and I had some of my research participants come — they were sad I’m leaving. They’re often forgotten in research, in health, in everything, and they felt like I was a voice for them,” says Lor.

“I told people I will come back; I just have to go get another kind of tool to help me develop as a researcher and make a greater impact.”

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someone

Communications intern position open at GHI

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someone

The Global Health Institute is looking for a communications intern who is savvy in social media and has the skills to perform other communications duties.

The intern works directly with the GHI communications manager and GHI’s administrator on a variety of tasks, including website posts, social media outreach, infographics, news writing, newsletter creation and other tasks as assigned.

Apply by August 11, 2017.

Responsibilities:

  • Take a lead role in the planning and execution of a social media platform (Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Vimeo)
  • Assist with website, including posting new content and making existing content more user friendly
  • Take a lead role in producing the weekly Events+ newsletter; assist with e-newsletter and annual report
  • Write and edit content, including news stories, feature articles, news releases and development and website materials
  • Perform administrative services such as word processing, proofreading, fact checking, organizing photo files, preparing information for distribution, creating graphics, etc.
  • Work at GHI events through set-up, cleanup and assistance throughout the event
  • Other ad hoc projects assigned by communications or administration that ensure that GHI communications run smoothly

Qualifications:

  • Excellent communication skills, especially listening, writing, editing and design capabilities
  • Hands on experience with social media, including Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn
  • Must be graduating no sooner than May 2018
  • Ideally, be able to work starting in late August/ September start date possible
  • Preferred: global health/ environmental health students with experience in Journalism and/or Mass Communications/Life Sciences Communication
  • Hands on experience with a variety of electronic tools including MailChimp, Adobe Creative Suite (InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator), Microsoft Office, WordPress
  • Working knowledge of AP style
  • Demonstrated ability to work independently within deadlines
  • Curiosity and enthusiasm for global health and GHI, and a desire to share the mission and vision to attract support for the Institute

Other Details:

  • Wage: $10.00 per hour
  • 10-12 hours per week depending on workload and class schedule. Most hours will be spent at the Medical Sciences Center office. More hours may be available during the summer.

How to apply:

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someone