Saving our planet to save ourselves

Howard Frumkin looks at challenges and opportunities in planetary health

What do you believe in? Leaving a livable world for our children and grandchildren? Not wasting what we’ve been given? Responsibility?

Likely, you believe in all three. For Howard Frumkin, professor and former dean of the University of Washington School of Public Health and former director of the National Center for Environmental Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, finding those shared beliefs is critical to moving beyond ideological divides to ensure planetary health for humans as well as the world we live in.

Frumkin will discuss “Planetary Health: Protecting Our World to Protect Ourselves,” at 5:30 p.m., Thursday, February 15, in the Great Hall at Memorial Union. A panel of University of Wisconsin-Madison science and humanities scholars—Lyric Bartholomay from Veterinary Medicine, Maureen Durkin from Population Health Sciences, Rick Keller from the International Division, Gregg Mitman from Medical History and the Nelson Institute, Jonathan Patz from the Global Health Institute (GHI) and Monica White from Environmental Sociology and the Nelson Institute—will respond to his remarks.

The free program will be followed by a paid reception. All are welcome. Registration is requested. The evening is hosted by the UW-Madison Global Health Institute and co-sponsored by the International Division, Office of Sustainability and Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies.

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Apply now for 2018 global health grants

The University of Wisconsin-Madison Global Health Institute (GHI) is pleased to announce the application period is open for its 2018 grants and awards. This competitive grant program is designed to support global health efforts of faculty, staff and graduate students across campus, fostering the Wisconsin Idea locally and globally.

This year, the Institute will offer a new grant, the Henry Anderson III Graduate Student Award in Environmental, Occupational and Public Health, in addition to Graduate Student Research Awards, Visiting Scholar Awards and Faculty and Staff Travel Awards. There will be no Seed Grant awards in 2018.

An expert on environmental and occupational disease, public health, epidemiology, disease and exposure surveillance, Henry Anderson III, M.D., is an adjunct professor in the Department of Population Health and former chief medical officer for the Wisconsin Division of Public Health. With the graduate student award, he hopes to support students pursuing research in the area of environment, occupation and global health.

The deadline for GHI grant applications is 11:59 p.m. January 29, 2018.

  • Henry Anderson III Graduate Student Award in Environmental, Occupational and Public Health supports graduate students interested in pursuing research in those topic areas. Application information is available here.
  • Graduate Student Research Awards supports doctoral students pursuing work in any relevant discipline whose graduate work will enhance global health activities on the UW-Madison campus and beyond. Grants of up to $5,000 each will be awarded. Application information is available here.
  • Visiting Scholar Awards brings visitors to UW-Madison who substantially enhance global health activities on campus in collaboration with a sponsoring UW-Madison faculty member or faculty team. Grants of up to $8,000 each will be awarded. Application information is available here.
  • Faculty and Staff Travel Awards are available for UW-Madison faculty and staff who are GHI affiliates. They can be used for international travel related to educational and research activities. Grants of up to $2,500 each will be awarded. Application information is available here.

To learn more about previous grant recipients, visit the global health research pages. For more information about the grants and grant process, contact the Global Health Institute, 265-9299.

By Ann Grauvogl/ November 9, 2017

UniverCity Year branching out into county

Building on a successful partnership with the City of Monona, UniverCity Year is gearing up to work with its second community. This fall, UW-Madison courses will help Dane County tackle issues around sustainability and equity.

UniverCity Year is looking for faculty and instructional staff who would be interested in working with Dane County projects in the areas of economic development, affordable housing, frequent users of county services and water quality and nutrient management.

UniverCity Year Dane County will match county identified projects with Fall 2017 courses at UW-Madison.

Find out more about the projects and how faculty and students can get involved.